Please contact your MP to ask for their support for a national inquiry into organised child abuse

Current Total Number of MPs Supporting an Inquiry: 145

Following the announcement of the letter by a group of seven cross-party MPs (Conservatives Zac Goldsmith and Tim Loughton, Liberal Democrats John Hemming and Tessa Munt, Labour Tom Watson and Simon Danczuk and Green Caroline Lucas) to Home Secretary Teresa May, calling for a national inquiry into organised child abuse and questions to be answered concerning existing investigations and loss of crucial materials and evidence (see also the original article here), I would like to ask all who agree to write to their own MPs to ask them to lend their support to this call. The more MPs who support this, the greater the likelihood of it occurring, and also the greater the media attention it is likely to get. You can write to your MP using the following site – https://www.writetothem.com/ – just by entering your postcode (though if using this site, try to avoid a template letter, as it may be blocked), or if you want to simply find their name and e-mail address, go to this site – http://findyourmp.parliament.uk/ .

Tim Loughton has given an excellent interview on the need for a national inquiry, in which he also urges everyone to write to their own MPs, and makes clear that he and Zac Goldsmith intend to write to all 650 MPs themselves (but this does not make letters from constituents any less urgent). Nushra Mansuri, Professional Officer for the British Association of Social Workers, is sending out a memo to their 14 000 members urging support for the campaign and to write to their MPs. Exaro News have reproduced the original letter from the seven MPs; I would urge people also to include this with their own correspondence. I will blog soon with links and annotations to this letter to explain more about each of the cases to which they refer. Here is the letter:

Dear Home Secretary,

We are writing to ask you to set up a full, properly resourced investigation into the failure of the Police to follow the evidence in a number of historical cases of child sexual abuse.

We would ask you to set up an independent panel, similar to the Inquiry you established into the Hillsborough tragedy, with powers to demand the release of all and any material from every agency involved.

We would like such a panel to work with the many victims of child sexual abuse from local authority care, the Anglican and Roman Catholic churches and schools, including public schools, to uncover the facts in cases including the following:

a. Operation Fernbridge – Richmond: Elm Guest House and Grafton Close Children’s Home, Norbiton, Weybridge & Petersham
b. Operation Orchid – Hackney and Islington
c. The Geoffrey Dickens’ dossiers – and Monkton Street home for Mentally Handicapped Children, Lambeth
d. Sir Cyril Smith – Rochdale, including Knowl View Special School
e. HM Customs & Excise – Russell Tricker videos
f. Trafficking involving British businessmen in Amsterdam
g. Warwick Spinks – Amsterdam & Prague
h. “Jane” alleged rape by a man who went on to become a Cabinet minister

We would ask that the panel examines:

i. why detailed dossiers – such as the documents submitted to the Home Office by the late Geoffrey Dickens – have disappeared
ii. why Police surveillance videos – said to be of prominent people who have been involved in paedophile rings – have gone missing
iii. why child pornography videos seized by HM Customs & Excise have been lost or destroyed
iv. why investigations appear repeatedly to have been stalled or abandoned over the last thirty years

We look forward to an early response

Yours sincerely

[original seven MPs]

It is also worth noting that in November 2012, Tim Loughton published an open letter to David Cameron (a longer document worth reading in full) which included the following:

I believe the time has come to set up an overarching inquiry into what went wrong across a whole range of institutions. It is something I first mooted some time ago when I warned that the Savile revelations only represent the ‘tip of the iceberg.’ Without this, I fear we risk a substantial number of inquiries across the police, the BBC, the heath service, the church and so on, overlapping in many of their findings and circumstances, but reporting incrementally at various intervals over coming months and years.
[...]
The purpose of such an overarching inquiry must include at least the following:

To investigate thoroughly what went wrong with child protection in the 1960s-1980s effectively up to the advent of the watershed 1989 Children Act. To see what institutions were implicated; was it an institutionalised problem based on ignorance, incompetence or complicity and whether everything reasonable has been done to bring wrongdoers to book subsequently?

To make sure that victims have been able to have their say, confident that their stories are at last being taken seriously and to investigate what were the barriers to this happening in the first place, and of course to offer them some form of closure.

To make sure that current child protection procedures are fit for purpose in the 21st century and that every institution which has regular contact with children and young people has in place robust protocols for child protection currently which manifestly show how very much more difficult it is now for the kind of abuse that happened previously in that institution or parallel ones to be repeated. The work that we instituted in the Department from 2010 through Munro, the Child Sexual Exploitation Action Plan and indeed with UKCCIS and the online angle that was obviously not an issue pre-1990’s must all feed into this.

Also in the same month, Shadow Home Secretary Yvette Cooper called for a single national investigation into abuse allegations, saying that this should look into ‘previous historical cases and inquiries, not just the ones that have been in the news’, as well as:

‘The new criminal investigation into child abuse in North Wales is vital. But the police must be able to range more widely beyond North Wales to follow any evidence.

“The government needs to set up a single overarching inquiry to draw together the confusing myriad of investigations now underway into institutional failures over child abuse.’

Ms Cooper has not yet made a statement about the current call for an inquiry, but one should hope that she will give it full backing as will the Labour leadership.


Below I include a template for a letter, based on part of that which I have sent to my own MP Jeremy Corbyn (Labour, Islington North) (my own letter also included some specific material about work as a campaigner, and about Islington). You may want to send something else entirely, this is just one suggestion for the type of letter. It is especially important to ask your MP that if they do not support this call for an inquiry, to give their reasons. You can also tweet your MP to ask them if on Twitter – to find their Twitter ID, see the list in the comments below, and tweet something like ‘@jeremycorbyn Will you support these [X - current number] of MPs’ call for a national inquiry into organised child abuse? http://ianpace.wordpress.com/2014/06/05/please-contact-your-mp-to-ask-for-their-support-for-a-national-inquiry-into-child-abuse/ ‘ . Once again, please do let me know any answers (my own Twitter ID is @ian_pace ).

I would be immensely grateful if you could contact me (ian@ianpace.com ) if you get a reply, to indicate its content, or if you have received no reply within one month of sending your query. I will keep a list on this blog of all sympathetic MPs, and with permission will reproduce replies. Exaro News , who have been the leading organisation pursuing these stories, are also interested in all responses from MPs to this, and I will naturally be drawing their attention to the list as it progresses.

Naturally, some may be sceptical about some of the claims about widespread abuse, or believe that much has been overplayed by internet conspiracy theorists. I have put together at the bottom of this blog a small sample of important articles looking at the scale of the issue, all either published or drawing entirely upon published sources. I will also continue to list other media coverage of this story here.
Jason Beattie, ‘MPs demand inquiry into historic claims of child sex abuse by Cabinet Ministers’, Daily Mirror, June 4th, 2014.
Amy Dyduch, ‘Zac Goldsmith calls for inquiry into child abuse “cover-ups” by local authorities’, Richmond and Twickenham Times, June 9th, 2014.
Joe Murphy, ‘MPs urge Theresa May to open inquiry into sex abuse claims at London children’s homes’, London Evening Standard, June 9th, 2014.


Draft Letter

Dear [....],

I am writing to you as a constituent to express my grave concerns about the issue of widespread organised abuse of children, in the hope that you will be prepared to support calls for a national inquiry on this subject. Almost every week brings new revelations of horrifying abuse – in children’s homes all over the country, in hundreds of private and state schools, in the Catholic Church, in the Church of England, in the entertainment industry, in the classical music world, and even involving some senior politicians. There has been much evidence to suggest that abuse in different places is linked through networks of abusers, and the complexities of the allegations can only be addressed on a national basis.

Recently a group of seven MPs – Conservatives Zac Goldsmith and Tim Loughton, Liberal Democrats John Hemming and Tessa Munt, Labour Tom Watson and Simon Danczuk, and Green Party Caroline Lucas – have collectively written to Home Secretary Theresa May to express their concern about how investigation of many of these allegations has been slow and seemingly obstructed, with files, videos and other materials going missing, and reluctance on the part of police and other agencies to investigate allegations seriously. Some of these MPs have gone so far as to suggest the sinister possibility that there may have been cover-ups to protect some high-profile individuals. This is detailed in the following article – http://www.exaronews.com/articles/5274/mps-call-on-theresa-may-to-set-up-inquiry-into-child-sex-abuse .

These MPs suggest an inquiry on the model of that conducted into the 1989 disaster at Hillsborough. I am asking you to let me know if you are prepared to support them in this call, and if you would thus be prepared to make public such support? I would respect your decision if you think otherwise, but would be very grateful if you could let me know your reasons.

Yours sincerely,


Supporters of an Inquiry

(The original group of seven MPs who initiated this are italicised). There are some small discrepancies between this list and that maintained by Exaro News, due to different criteria employed as to whether an MP has definitively declared their support or not. I try to point these out where necessary.


Conservatives: 35

Zac Goldsmith (Richmond Park)
Tim Loughton (East Worthing and Shoreham)

Andrew Bingham (High Peak)
Bob Blackman (Harrow East)
Graham Brady (Altrincham and Sale West)
Robert Buckland (South Swindon)
Conor Burns (Bournemouth West)
Neil Carmichael (Stroud)
Douglas Carswell (Clacton)
Tracey Crouch (Chatham and Aylesforth)
Nick de Bois (Enfield North)
Nadine Dorries (Mid Bedfordshire)
Richard Drax (South Dorset)
Jonathan Evans (Cardiff North)
George Freeman (Mid Norfolk)
Mark Garnier (Wyre Forest)
Charles Hendry (Wealden)
Philip Hollobone (Kettering)
Bernard Jenkin (Essex North)
Chris Kelly (Dudley South)
Charlotte Leslie (Bristol North West)
Jack Lopresti (Filton and Bradley Stoke)
Jonathan Lord (Woking)
Sir Peter Luff (Mid Worcestershire)
Jason McCartney (Colne Valley)
Paul Maynard (Blackpool North and Cleveleys)
Anne Marie Morris (Newton Abbott)
Caroline Nokes (Romsey and Southampton North)
Sir James Paice (South East Cambridgeshire)
Sir John Randall (Uxbridge and South Ruislip)
Henry Smith (Crawley)
Nicholas Soames (Mid Sussex)
Caroline Spelman (Meridan)
Iain Stewart (Milton Keynes South)
Craig Whittaker (Calder Valley)

Exaro are also reporting Gordon Henderson as a supporter (saying he has indicated that to Tim Loughton), but I have been forwarded a generic reply from a constituent (reproduced below), dated 17/6/14; this constituent has since re-written to Henderson and I will update this blog if any further reply is received.

Liberal Democrats: 15
John Hemming (Birmingham Yardley)
Tessa Munt (Wells)

Annette Brooke (Mid Dorset and North Poole)
Paul Burstow (Sutton, Cheam & Worcester Park)
Mike Crockart (Edinburgh West)
Stephen Gilbert (St Austell and Newquay)
Duncan Hames (Chippenham) (PPS to Liberal Democrat leader Nick Clegg)
Julian Huppert (Cambridge)
John Leech (Manchester Withington)
Greg Mulholland (Leeds North West)
Adrian Sanders (Torbay)
Ian Swales (Redcar)
Mike Thornton (Eastleigh)
Mark Williams (Ceredigion)
Roger Williams (Brecon and Radnorshire)

Labour: 82
Tom Watson (West Bromwich East)
Simon Danczuk (Rochdale)

Debbie Abrahams (Oldham East and Saddleworth)
Heidi Alexander (Lewisham East)
Jon Ashworth (Leicester South)
Hilary Benn (Leeds Central)
Clive Betts (Sheffield South East)
Luciana Berger (Liverpool Wavertree)
Tom Blenkinsop (Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland)
Paul Blomfield (Sheffield Central)
Lyn Brown (West Ham)
Karen Buck (Westminster North, PPS to Ed Miliband)
Richard Burden (Birmingham Northfield)
Andy Burnham (Leigh)
Ronnie Campbell (Blyth Valley)
Martin Caton (Gower)
Katy Clark (North Ayrshire and Arran)
John Cryer (Leyton and Wanstead)
Jim Cunningham (Coventry South)
Geraint Davies (Swansea West)
Jim Dobbin (Heywood and Middleton)
Stephen Doughty (Cardiff South and Penarth)
Michael Dugher (Barnsley East)
Julie Elliott (Sunderland North)
Natascha Engel (North-East Derbyshire)
Jim Fitzpatrick (Poplar and Limehouse)
Rob Flello (Stoke on Trent South)
Paul Flynn (Newport West)
Yvonne Fovargue (Makerfield)
Mike Gapes (Ilford South)
Pat Glass (North-West Durham)
Mary Glindon (North Tyneside)
Tom Greatrex (Rutherglen and Hamilton North)
Kate Green (Stretford and Urmston)
Lilian Greenwood (Nottingham South)
Andrew Gwynne (Denton and Reddish)
Peter Hain (Neath)
Kate Hoey (Vauxhall)
Huw Irranca-Davies (Ogmore)
Diana Johnson (Kingston-upon-Hull North)
Barbara Keeley (Worsley and Eccles South)
Ian Lavery (Wansbeck)
Mark Lazarowicz (Edinburgh North and Leith)
Emma Lewell-Buck (South Shields)
Michael McCann (East Kilbride, Strathaven and Lesmahag)
Kerry McCarthy (Bristol East)
John McDonnell (Hayes and Harlington)
Catherine McKinnell (Newcastle-Upon-Tyne North)
Khalid Mahmood (Birmingham Perry Barr)
Seema Malhotra (Feltham and Heston)
John Mann (Bassetlaw)
Ian Mearns (Gateshead)
Jessica Morden (Newport East)
Grahame Morris (Easington)
Lisa Nandy (Wigan)
Chi Onwurah (Newcastle upon Tyne Central)
Sandra Osborne (Ayr, Carrick and Cumnock)
Albert Owen (Ynys Mõn)
Teresa Pearce (Erith & Thamesmead)
Toby Perkins (Chesterfield)
Stephen Pound (Ealing North)
Yasmin Qureshi (Bolton South East)
Steve Reed (Croydon North)
Steve Rotherham (Liverpool Walton)
Lindsay Roy (Glenrothes)
Andy Sawford (Corbyn and East Northamptonshire)
Alison Seabeck (Plymouth Moor View)
Barry Sheerman (Huddersfield)
Virendra Sharma (Ealing Southall)
Jim Sheridan (Paisley and Renfrewshire North)
Gavin Shuker (Luton South)
Andy Slaughter (Hammersmith)
Owen Smith (Pontypridd)
John Spellar (Warley)
Gisela Stuart (Birmingham Edgbaston)
Mark Tami (Alyn and Deeside)
Emily Thornberry (Islington South and Finsbury)
Karl Turner (Kingston upon Hull East)
Derek Twigg (Halton)
Stephen Twigg (Liverpool West Derby)
Chris Williamson (Derby North)
Iain Wright (Hartlepool)

Exaro are not listing Lisa Nandy’s name on grounds that the Labour frontbench have to make a collective decision. I received confirmation by e-mail from Nandy on 17/6/14, and permission to quote the comment given below, and as there has been no response to two e-mails asking if her position has changed, I will keep this name on the list unless I hear from her office of a change of position.

Green: 1
Caroline Lucas (Brighton Pavilion)

Respect: 1
George Galloway (Bradford West)

Plaid Cymru: 3
Jonathan Edwards (Camarthen West and Dinefwr)
Elfin Llwyd (Dwyfor Merionnydd)
Hywel Williams (Arfon)

Democratic Unionist Party: 5 (Northern Ireland)
Nigel Dodds (Belfast North)
Jeffrey Donaldson (Lagan Valley)
Dr William McCrea (Antrim South)
Ian Paisley Jr (North Antrim)
Jim Shannon (Strangford)

Social Democratic and Labour Party: 2 (Northern Ireland)
Mark Durkan (Foyle)
Margaret Ritchie (South Down)

Alliance: 1 (Northern Ireland)
Naomi Long (Belfast East)


Other supporters, not sitting MPs

Richard Howitt (MEP for Essex, Herts, Beds, Cambs, Norfolk, Suffolk).
Tony McNulty (former Labour MP for Harrow East)
Louise Mensch (former Conservative MP for Corby)

Alan Hazelhurst (UKIP Parliamentary candidate for Wakefield)
Mike Parker (Plaid Cymru candidate for Ceredigion at 2015 election)

The Right Reverend Paul Butler, Bishop of Durham

Peter Tatchell (former Green Party parliamentary candidate, Oxford East)

House of Lords

Baron Adebowale (Crossbencher)
Baron Harris of Harringey (Labour)
Baroness Hussein-Ece (Liberal Democrat)
Baroness Smith of Basildon (Labour)
Baroness Walmsley (Liberal Democrat)


Organisations

British Association of Social Workers
National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC)


Comments from Supporters

Zac Goldsmith: ‘We now know of many cases of child abuse that went uninvestigated for far too long, not least relating to Jimmy Savile. But we also know that countless questions remain unanswered, and they must be – in full. The government should establish – and properly resource – an independent inquiry so that a line can be drawn, once and for all.';
‘Very serious questions around Elm Guest House in Barnes have gone unanswered for so long that many have simply concluded that the authorities aren’t interested in uncovering answers. The same seems to be true of other inquiries into child sex abuse at institutions across the country. If it wants to draw a line and move on, the Government must establish a defining, properly resourced and all-encompassing inquiry, in which victims and the public can have confidence.’

Tim Loughton: ‘Virtually every week, the public is bombarded with new stories about sexual abuse of children coming to light, yet they stretch as far back as the 1960s. Few areas have been left untouched with increasingly alarming stories involving schools, churches, care homes, entertainment, sport and of course politicians and celebrities. Most alarming is a consistent theme of the reluctance or, more worringly, seeming complicity of police and other agencies to investigate the allegations seriously, and pursue the perpetrators rigorously. Documents go missing and investigations are curtailed with a chilling frequency, and that now threatens a serious undermining of the public’s confidence in our current child-protection system despite all the progress that has undoubtedly been made in recent years.’

Robert Buckland: ‘I think that an inquiry could be of real value, but the terms of reference need to be carefully considered first. Many victims have been used to getting their expectations raised, and then being let down. Before any inquiry is set up, there needs to be agreement and understanding as to the desired outcomes. I firmly believe that, wherever possible, criminal prosecution is the preferable means of redress, but the case of Savile is clearly one that cannot be covered by such an option… Sometimes we vest too much into judicial inquiries. They are not a panacea for all ills, sadly. My instinctive support for the victims makes me supportive of this sort of pressure, however.’

Neil Carmichael: ‘child care is a top concern of @CommonsEd & I am happy to promote a wider inquiry into child abuse.’

Tracey Crouch: ‘I do agree with the sentiment behind the call for such an inquiry. My mother was a social worker and I do very much appreciate the importance of this issue – I will therefore speak with my colleagues, asking to be kept informed of any updates regarding their letter.’

Nick de Bois: ‘I have read the arguments put forward and very happy to add my name to this important campaign.’

Jonathan Lord: ‘I would be happy to support the call for such an inquiry and I will be talking to Conservative MP colleagues on your list about this.’

Jason McCartney: ‘I do support a full inquiry into historical child abuse that was not properly investigated at the time.’

Henry Smith: ‘I support independent inquiries into child abuse particularly in light of the horrendous discoveries recently.’

John Hemming: ‘The whole area is still not in any way properly accountable or subject to independent checks. The sagas with Kincora and Cyril Smith do seem to have a pattern of similarities that needs a proper independent investigation. Our system, however, is very tolerant of misconduct in public office.’

Paul Burstow: ‘I support the need for an inquiry.’

Julian Huppert: ‘Happy to support it.’

John Leech: ‘Support national inquiry into child abuse. Too many mistakes too often.’

Sir Peter Luff: ‘Yes I certainly do; this systematic failure to protect the vulnerable must be investigated.’

Greg Mulholland: ‘Yes happy to support this’

Adrian Sanders: ‘Very happy to support’

Mark Williams: ‘I support an enquiry in principle’.

Tom Watson: ‘There is a growing consensus among MPs of all political parties that the party leaders should agree to resource adequately searching investigations into historical allegations of child sexual abuse. The failure to act needs to be urgently addressed, and there is a belief that much more needs to be done to uncover what has happened in previous investigations';
‘I deeply admire Zac Goldsmith adding his weight to this important issue. The fact that we now have a cross-party coalition asking for a national investigation makes it very hard for the police and ministers to ignore'; ‘They [the police] are very dedicated and hardworking but I now believe they are chronically under-resourced and have not got the capacity to deal with the weight and volume of allegations made.’

Simon Danczuk: ‘I am pleased that we have politicians from across the political divide who are coming together to try to get to the bottom of what is a murky and nasty abuse of power. As we have seen from the story that we told about Cyril Smith, there was a network at the highest level that was out to protect him at every turn. We now need the home secretary to step up to the mark and instigate an investigation that leaves no stone unturned. I look forward to seeing what her response is.’

Tom Blenkinsop: ‘more than happy to support’

Paul Blomfield: ‘I’ll add my name to call for a national inquiry into child sex abuse after discussing it over the w/e with constituents.’

Karen Buck: ‘Agree we do need a proper over-arching inquiry.’

Richard Burden: ‘I have spoken to @tom_watson; support the efforts he & others are making to get to the truth about organised child abuse.’

Katy Clark: ‘I agree with the call for a national inquiry and happy to support the campaign to achieve this.’

John Cryer: ‘I agree with you [constituent] and the MPs asking for this inquiry, so I have written to the Home Office and will write to you again when I have a reply.’

Geraint Davies: ‘I support a national independent inquiry into past & present organised child abuse in public & private institutions.’

Jim Dobbin: (sent from his office) ‘Jim would like to put his name to your call for an inquiry into historical sexual abuse and desires that Teresa May sets up an inquiry akin to that investigating the Hillsborough Disaster.’

Michael Dugher: ‘ I agree that this is an important issue and it is clear that we need a properly structured inquiry that draws together fragmented investigations into institutions throughout the country.

Although legislation has moved forward and great strides have been made in child protection, we all know that much more needs to be done. And the scale of Jimmy Savile’s abuse should be a wake-up call to everyone.

It is my belief that the Home Secretary should step in now, in the light of several reports and establish an overarching inquiry led by child protection experts to draw together the fragmented investigations so we can make sure vulnerable young people are listened to and better protected from these horrible crimes.’

Tom Greatrex ‘… in principle yes [to support of an inquiry] although precise scope and remit of inquiry needs to be established in detail before giving final view.’

Diane Johnson: ‘The Home Secretary should step in now, in the light of several reports and establish an overarching inquiry led by child protection experts.’

Barbara Keeley: ‘There are calls for a national inquiry into child abuse and MPs are being asked to support this. I do support the need for a national inquiry.

The NHS should already have reported on the inquiries into abuse by Jimmy Savile on NHS premises, reports which were promised this month. But now we hear that the report related to abuses at Stoke Mandeville will be delayed until later in the year. This means that some of Savile’s victims will be waiting still longer for answers.

There is now a need for a properly structured inquiry that draws together fragmented investigations into institutions throughout the country. Instead of many separate inquiries, the Home Secretary should step in and establish an overarching inquiry led by child protection experts so we can make sure vulnerable young people are listened to and protected from these horrible crimes in future.’ (see Keeley’s blog post here).

Emma Lewell-Buck: ‘Crimes of child sexual abuse are often hidden, yet they are profoundly damaging. I am wholeheartedly in support of a national enquiry. Victims should be heard and those responsible held to account.’

Catherine McKinnell: ‘Yes, after appalling constituency case-need overarching one drawing all others together ensuring we really do learn from past.’

Khalid Mahmood: ‘There is a real need for this so that people who suffered a life of torment can have a proper resolution. There is also a policing issue where it appears that some people are treated as ‘off limits’ by the police because of their high-profile personalities and stardom.’

Jessica Morden: ‘Happy to support the call for #CSAinquiry and to add my name to the list.’

Lisa Nandy: ‘I called on the Government to set up an overarching inquiry last year, and I still hold that view.’

Chi Onwurah: ‘Happy to support it CSA Inquiry.’

Albert Owen: ‘I support the campaign for an independent national inquiry into child abuse. I will work with parliamentary colleagues and others.’

Toby Perkins: ‘Happy to support the call for enquiry into historic child abuse cases, have remained hidden for too long.’

Yasmin Qureshi: ‘I have been arguing for long time about how much sexual abuse there is within home and institutions'; ‘In my previous life I saw so much abuse of the young, sexual and physical. Made me cry.’

Steve Reed: ‘I support having an inquiry yes, but there needs to be discussion over the scope so it’s powerful enough . . . it’s what Yvette called for 18 months ago, an overarching inquiry into all the abuse scandals . . . with the proviso that it’s in line with Yvette’s call in Nov 2012 for overarching inquiry . . . there are many victims’ advocacy groups that are supported by ppl who were abused . . . pls note I’m not supporting any particular remit until it’s been discussed with charities etc.’

Steve Rotherham: ‘Worked behind the scenes with Tom Watson on the issue, so happy to support an independent inquiry.’

Andy Sawford: ‘ My view is that the time is right for a properly structured inquiry that draws together fragmented investigations into institutions throughout the country. The scale of Jimmy Savile’s abuse should be a wake-up call to everyone. The Home Secretary should step in and establish an overarching inquiry led by child protection experts so we can make sure vulnerable young people are listened to and better protected from these horrible crimes.’ (See Sawford’s blog post on the subject)

Barry Sheerman: ‘Yes as long as it doesn’t involve police trawling or destruction of people’s lives bailed but not charged!’

Jim Sheridan: ‘I am happy to support and I will do what I can to help the campaign.’

John Spellar: ‘In light of recent revelations regarding the scale of Jimmy Savile’s abuse, it is becoming clear that we need a properly structured inquiry that draws together fragmented investigations into institutions throughout the country. Although legislation has moved forward and great strides have ben made in child protection, we all know that much more needs to be done.

Unfortunately, the Government is dragging its heels on this issue. The Home Secretary should step in now in order to establish an overarching inquiry led by child protection experts to draw together the fragmented investigations so we can make sure vulnerable young people are listened to and better protected from these horrible crimes.

Gavin Shuker: ‘I’m supportive. Thanks.’

Owen Smith: ‘Count me in’

Gisela Stuart: ‘You may add me to the list.’

Emily Thornberry: ‘I have recently been contacted by a number of constituents calling for an over-arching investigation into historic allegations of child abuse across the United Kingdom. These constituents share the disgust that I have felt in recent years at the successive revelations of cover-ups and institutional failures in relation to the most vulnerable children in our society.

It is my view that wherever possible allegations of child abuse, however far they date back, should be investigated by the police and then prosecuted by the Crown Prosecution Service so that the perpetrators can then be sentenced to a long time in one of Her Majesty’s prisons. Judicial inquiries are no substitute for that and have disappointed in the past.

However, I appreciate that the investigation/prosecution route is not always possible, for example because of the passage of time or institutional foot-dragging have impeded the search for answers. There are also occasions where the scale of institutional failure will demand a broader frame of reference than a criminal trial targeted at a single person or a handful of individuals.

These have been the lessons of Jimmy Savile and his horrible crimes. That is why we need a properly structured inquiry that draws together myriad, fragmented investigations into institutions throughout the country. The Home Secretary should step in now and establish an overarching inquiry led by child protection experts to draw together these investigations so that young people are better protected in future.’

Karl Turner: ‘happy to support absolutely’

Derek Twigg: ‘We need a properly structured inquiry that draws together fragmented
investigations into institutions throughout the country. Although
legislation has moved forward and great strides have been made in child
protection, we all know that much more needs to be done. The scale of
Jimmy’s Savile’s abuse should be the wake-up call to everyone.

The Home Secretary should step in now, in the light of several reports and
establish an overarching inquiry led by child protection experts to draw
together the fragmented investigations so we can make sure vulnerable young
people are listened to and better protected from these horrible crimes.’

Stephen Twigg: ‘please keep in touch about the campaign; thank you for contacting me.’

Ian Wright: ‘I fully support the idea of a full independent and open inquiry into child abuse.’

Jim Shannon: ‘I am keen to have answers. Those who have been abused deserve to have those who were involved exposed for what they have done.’

Naomi Long: ‘I do support such an inquiry. The Kincora Boys’ Home was in my own constituency.’

Richard Howitt: ‘The emerging cases show that there are victims who have suffered for too long, and justice requires the setting up of an inquiry without any further delay.

I am concerned that some alleged abusers have been treated as ‘off limits’ by the police because of their high-profile personalities and stardom.

The indication is that key evidence in child abuse cases may have been lost and I believe a panel must examine why detailed dossiers have disappeared and why police surveillance videos said to be of prominent people who have been involved in paedophile rings have gone missing?

I am sorry that the Home Secretary is currently refusing this request but hope that overwhelming pressure from across the political spectrum can change her mind.”’ (see this article)

The Right Reverend Paul Butler, Bishop of Durham: ‘If we don’t face up to the past failures we will never really improve the future.

Powerful people have engaged in serious abuse and worked with each other to create opportunities and share their vices and victims.”

[The] true cost of child abuse and abuse of adults at risk is far higher than any of us have ever been prepared to acknowledge.

Justice, fairness and the very health of our society demands we no longer hide away from this dark part of our story’ (see this interview).

“We need an independent public inquiry and we need it very soon,
NSPCC: ‘We’d support any Inquiry organised & designed to uncover, as swiftly & effectively as possible, crimes against children.’


Opponents

Conservatives:
Michael Gove (Surrey Heath; Education Secretary)
Richard Graham (Gloucester)
Chris Grayling (Epsom & Ewell, Lord Chancellor & Justice Secretary)

Liberal Democrats
Nick Clegg (Sheffield Hallam) (see this article)

Labour
Eric Joyce (Falkirk) (see Joyce’s blog post here).
Meg Munn (Sheffield Heeley)

Other
Baroness Howarth of Breckland


‘Not Yet’ (have not ruled out future support for an inquiry, but not supporting one yet)

Conservatives:
David Cameron (Prime Minister, Witney)
Simon Burns (Chelmsford)
Stephen Crabb (Preseli Pembrokeshire)
Mike Freer (Finchley and Golders Green)
Gordon Henderson (Sittingbourne and Sheppey)
Gareth Johnson (Dartford)
Andrew Lansley (South Cambridgeshire)
Patrick McLoughlin (Derbyshire Dales)
Anne Main (St Albans)
Andrew Mitchell (Sutton Coldfield)
James Morris (Halesowen and Rowley Regis)
Robert Neill (Bromley and Chiselhurst)
Claire Perry (Devizes)
Mark Prisk (Hertford and Stortford)
Grant Schapps (Welwyn Hatfield, Conservative Party Chairman)
Alok Sharma (Reading West)
Theresa Villiers (Chipping Barnet)

Liberal Democrats
Norman Baker (Lewes, Crime Prevention Minister) (on the basis of a meeting with Peter McKelvie and Liz Davies – further clarification to follow)

Labour
Sarah Champion (Rotherham)

Other Non-MPs
Lord Ashdown (see this interview)


No Reply to Query

Conservatives:
John Redwood (Wokingham)

Liberal Democrats

Labour
Jeremy Corbyn (Islington North)


Undecided Yet

Conservatives:

Liberal Democrats

Labour

Unable to Commit

Conservatives:
Tom Brake (Carshalton and Wallington)

Liberal Democrats

Labour


Comments from Others

Tom Brake: ‘My apologies but as a minister I am unable to sign petitions’.

Chris Grayling: ‘I do not support a public enquiry is that I believe it would take years, cost enormous amounts of money, and delay the kind of action that is really needed which is to allow the police to investigate allegations of child abuse and prosecute where appropriate. It would end up with a massive exercise, covering all kinds of different circumstances, ranging from within family assaults on children, to the horrible case involving the singer from the Lost Prophets to questions about TV stars and starstruck 15 year old fans. I’m not sure what it could possibly hope to achieve. We are better concentrating on prosecuting successfully historic and current abuse cases, and providing support to victims and education about the problem to society. Of course we should take tough action to tackle child abuse but that is best achieved by prosecuting the guilty and working to prevent it from happening in the first place. ‘

Norman Baker was quoted in the Richmond and Twickenham Times as saying: ‘There are a number of inquiries taking place into historic child sex abuse cases, including criminal investigations. It is important we allow these to run their course before taking further action’.

Claire Perry: ‘Thank you very much for your email about the organised abuse of children and the possibility of a national inquiry on this subject. I sincerely apologise for the delay in responding to you.

I have read your letter with much interest and I certainly appreciate your distress. I have therefore written to the Home Secretary, the Rt Hon Theresa May MP, expressing my concerns and asking her to look into this issue as a matter of priority.

Sarah Champion: ‘I completely support the motivation and rationalisation for your inquiry but, as it stands, it is too broad. I would be happy to work with you to refine the wording so that the inquiry would have a better chance of uncovering the perpetrators of this vile crime and preventing it from happening in the future.’

Emily Thornberry: [To constituent, written letter dated 11/6/14, received 19/6/14] ‘Thank you for your email about the investigation into allegations of child abuse. I note that concerns over this investigation have been brought to the attention of the Home Secretary on more than one occasion, and I have drawn your email to her attention.

I enclose a copy of my letter, and I will be back in touch as soon as I receive a reply’

[Letter to Home Secretary from Emily Thornberry, 11/6/14: 'X has recently contacted me about the call for an inquiry into the investigation of allegations relating to the organised abuse of children. I enclose a copy of his email.

I would be grateful if you could confirm that you have received this call for an inquiry, and I would appreciate any information you are able to provide about the steps being taken to ensure that this investigation is effective and complete.

Thank you for your help in this matter. I look forward to hearing from you.]

Response from constituent to this communication from Thornberry: ‘For what ever reason, she has declined to acknowledge the contents of my email properly, specifically ‘My grave concerns about the issue of widespread organised abuse of children, in the hope that you will be prepared to support calls for a national inquiry into the subject”

When I have received a response from the Home Secretary, I will of course let you know’.


James Morris
: ‘As I have already said I can see need for inquiry but can’t risk jeopardising existing criminal investigations.’


Mike Freer
: ‘Child abuse is an abhorrent crime, no matter when, or where, it occurs. It is important that the Government is committed to tackling it, in whatever form it takes.

Both the historical cases of child abuse and recent cases of organised sexual exploitation raise a number of important issues for the Government, social services, the police, the criminal justice system and others. It is important that we learn lessons from these reviews of historic child abuse cases. That is why the Minister for Policing and Criminal Justice, Damian Green, is leading a National Group which will work across government to urgently address any missed opportunities to protect children and vulnerable people.

There are a number of inquiries taking place into historic child sex abuse cases, including criminal investigations. It is important we allow these to run their course before taking further action.

I join the Government in urging anyone with concerns or information to report them to the police. I am glad that the Government has made clear that if anyone has concerns about police handling of such complaints they should report them to the Independent Police Complaints Commission. It is important that these authorities act on the information provided to them.’

+ (second communication) ‘There is a longstanding practice that overarching inquiries are not undertaken whilst existing inquiries – which may result in criminal prosecutions. This has been respected so as not to jeopardise any prosecutions. The most important thing for any victim is surely to see perpetrators prosecuted.’

Gordon Henderson (17/6/14): said [according to a constituent] that he appreciated my [constituent's] concern about the issue.that it was an abhorrent crime. That he was confident the government is committed to tackling it and was not aware of any cover up by the current government. He said: “Both the historical cases of child abuse and recent cases of organised sexual exploitation raise a number of important issues for the government, social services, the police, the criminal justice system and others. It is important that we learn lessons from these reviews of historic child abuse cases. That is why the minister for policing and criminal justice Damian Green is leading a national group which will work across government to urgently address any missed opportunities to protect children and vulnerable people. There are a number of inquiries taking place into historic child sex abuse cases, including criminal investigations. It is important we allow these to run their course before taking further action. I join the government in urging anyone with concerns or information to report them to the police. I am glad that the government has made clear that if anyone has concerns about police handling of such complaints they should report them to the Independent Police Complaints Commission . It is important that these authorities act on the information provided to them.”

Gareth Johnson: ‘I appreciate your concern about this issue. Child abuse is an abhorrent crime, no matter when, or where, it occurs. It is important that the Government is committed to tackling it, in whatever form it takes.

Both the historical cases of child abuse and recent cases of organised sexual exploitation raise a number of important issues for the Government, social services, the police, the criminal justice system and others. It is important that we learn lessons from these reviews of historic child abuse cases. That is why the Minister for Policing and Criminal Justice, Damian Green, is leading a National Group which will work across government to urgently address any missed opportunities to protect children and vulnerable people.

There are a number of inquires taking place into historic child sex abuse cases, including criminal investigations. It is important we allow these to run their course before taking further action.’

Andrew Lansley: ‘I do appreciate your concern about this important issue. Child abuse is an abhorrent crime, no matter when, or where, it occurs. I can assure you that the Government is committed to tackling it, in whatever form it takes.

Historical cases of child abuse and recent cases of organised sexual exploitation raise a number of important issues for the Government, social services, the police, the criminal justice system and others. That is why the Prime Minister has asked Damian Green, Home Office Policing and Criminal Justice Minister, to lead Ministers across Government and a new national group to address urgently the missed opportunities to protect vulnerable children.

The Sexual Violence Against Children and Vulnerable People national group is a panel of experts brought together by the Home Office to co-ordinate and implement the lessons from recent inquiries into historic sexual abuse and current sexual violence prevention issues. It will work to improve cross Government delivery, identify problems and solutions and act swiftly to resolve them.’

Patrick McLoughlin: ‘Thank you for contacting me about historic allegations of child abuse.

I appreciate your concern about this issue. Child abuse is an abhorrent crime, no matter when, or where, it occurs. It is important that the Government is committed to tackling it, in whatever form it takes.

Both the historical cases of child abuse and recent cases of organised sexual exploitation raise a number of important issues for the Government, social services, the police, the criminal justice system and others. It is important that we learn lessons from these reviews of historic child abuse cases. That is why the Minister for Policing and Criminal Justice, Damian Green, is leading a National Group which will work across government to urgently address any missed opportunities to protect children and vulnerable people.

There are a number of inquiries taking place into historic child sex abuse cases, including criminal investigations. It is important we allow these to run their course before taking further action.

I am glad that the Government has made clear that if anyone has concerns about police handling of such complaints they should report them to the Independent Police Complaints Commission. It is important that these authorities act on the information provided to them.’

Anne Main: ‘Thank you for contacting me about historic allegations of child abuse.

I appreciate your concern about this issue. Child abuse is an abhorrent crime, no matter when, or where, it occurs. It is important that the Government is committed to tackling it, in whatever form it takes.

Both the historical cases of child abuse and recent cases of organised sexual exploitation raise a number of important issues for the Government, social services, the police, the criminal justice system and others. It is important that we learn lessons from these reviews of historic child abuse cases. That is why the Minister for Policing and Criminal Justice, Damian Green, is leading a National Group which will work across government to urgently address any missed opportunities to protect children and vulnerable people.

There are a number of inquiries taking place into historic child sex abuse cases, including criminal investigations. It is important we allow these to run their course before taking further action.

I join the Government in urging anyone with concerns or information to report them to the police. I am glad that the Government has made clear that if anyone has concerns about police handling of such complaints they should report them to the Independent Police Complaints Commission. It is important that these authorities act on the information provided to them’.

Andrew Mitchell: ‘I appreciate your concern in this matter. Child abuse is an abhorrent crime no matter when or where it occurs. I can assure you that the Government is committed to tackling it in whatever form it takes.

Both the historical cases of child abuse and recent cases of organised sexual exploitation raise a number of important issues for the Government, Social Services, the Police, the criminal justice system and others. That is why the Prime Minister has asked Damian Green, Home Office Policing and Criminal Justice Minister, to lead Ministers across Government and a new national group to address urgently the missed opportunities to protect vulnerable children.

The Sexual Violence Against Children and Vulnerable People national group is a panel of experts brought together by the Home Office to co-ordinate and implement the learning from recent inquiries into historic sexual abuse and current sexual violence prevention issues. It will work to improve cross Government delivery, identify problems and solutions and act swiftly to resolve them.

On historic allegations the Government urges anyone with concerns or information to report them to the Police. if they have concerns about the Police they should report them to the Independent Police Complaints Commission and the Government expects those authorities to act on the information provided to them’.

Robert Neill: ‘Thank you for contacting me about the calls for a national inquiry into child sex abuse.

It is needless to say that child abuse, in any form, is an abhorrent crime. Clearly, and without doubt, trusted institutions – including children’s homes, schools and the Church – have failed to protect some of the most vulnerable young people that have been put into their care, and I believe these abuses must be uncovered in their entirety and without delay.

It is also absolutely crucial that we learn from the mistakes of the past to ensure every effort can, and is made to prevent similar crimes like this reoccurring in the future. That is why the Rt Hon Damian Green MP, the Minister for Policing and Criminal Justice, is currently leading a National Group which will work across government to urgently address any missed opportunities to protect children and vulnerable adults. The lessons that emerge from this must, I feel, dictate future policy and go some way in shaping current campaigns, whether it be the push to end female genital mutilation or the new announcements to protect children’s emotional and psychological wellbeing.

Whilst I appreciate the issue your raise, and have, of course, taken due note of your concerns, I do not feel this proposed national inquiry stands as the best course for justice at the present time. As you are no doubt aware, there are a number of separate inquiries already taking place into accusations of historic child sex abuse, some of which involve criminal investigations, and I believe it is absolutely right we allow these to run their proper course before taking further action. To interweave these with a wider, more general inquiry, like the one suggested, would, I feel, be completely counterproductive. Anyone who has concerns regarding malpractice or has evidence that the current investigations are not being conducted sufficiently should report them to the Independent Police Complaints Commission.

Thank you again for taking the trouble to contact me on this incredibly important issue. i hope my response reassures that you [sic] the Government is approaching all child sex abuse cases very seriously and is taking a proactive stance on the matter. Whilst I would not rule out an inquiry of this nature taking place in the future, I do not feel that the investigation a number of my colleagues are supporting is, at this time, appropriate. If you wish to discuss the matter in any further detail, of course, please do not hesitate to get in touch.’

Mark Prisk: ‘It is important that the Government is committed to tackling it, in whatever form it takes. Damian Green is leading a National Group which will work across government to urgently address any missed opportunities to protect children and vulnerable people’.

Grant Schapps: (sent on Schapps’ behalf by his office) ‘Grant appreciates your concern about this issue. Child abuse is an abhorrent crime, no matter when, or where, it occurs. It is important that the Government is committed to tackling it, in whatever form it takes.

Both the historical cases of child abuse and recent cases of organised sexual exploitation raise a number of important issues for the Government, social services, the police, the criminal justice system and others. It is important that we learn lessons from these reviews of historic child abuse cases. That is why the Minister for Policing and Criminal Justice, Damian Green, is leading a National Group which will work across government to urgently address any missed opportunities to protect children and vulnerable people.

There are a number of inquiries taking place into historic child sex abuse cases, including criminal investigations. It is important we allow these to run their course before taking further action.

Grant joins the Government in urging anyone with concerns or information to report them to the police. Grant is glad that the Government has made clear that if anyone has concerns about police handling of such complaints they should report them to the Independent Police Complaints Commission. It is important that these authorities act on the information provided to them’.

Alok Sharma: ‘There are a number of inquiries taking place into child abuse cases, including criminal investigations. It is important we allow these to run their course before taking further action’.

Theresa Villiers: ‘Thank you for contacting me about historic allegations of child abuse.

I fully understand your concern about this issue. I find it truly shocking that so many horrific child abuse cases keep coming to light.

Both the historical cases of child abuse and recent cases of organised sexual exploitation raise a number of important issues for the Government, social services, the police, the criminal justice system and others. It is vital that we learn lessons from these reviews of historic child abuse cases. That is why the Minister for Policing and Criminal Justice, Damian Green, is leading a National Group which will work across government to urgently address any missed opportunities to protect children and vulnerable people.

There are a number of inquiries taking place into historic child sex abuse cases, including criminal investigations. We need to allow these to run their course before taking further action.

I would urge anyone with information to report it to the police. The Government has also made clear that if anyone has concerns about police handling of such complaints, they should report them to the Independent Police Complaints Commission. I am confident that these authorities will act on the information provided to them’.

(I am keeping another blog post with the standardised template responses such as some of those above)

Richard Graham: ‘You can care AND ask if a national enquiry this size wd take > a year & hold up current police work’.


Questions in the House of Commons

Tim Loughton (Conservative, East Worthing and Shoreham): The Leader of the House may be aware that together with our hon. Friend the Member for Richmond Park (Zac Goldsmith) and five other colleagues across the Chamber, I have written to the Home Secretary to ask for an independent inquiry into historic child abuse. That call has already been taken up by more than 70 hon. Members from across the House. Given that new stories emerge almost daily of grotesque abuse of children going back to the ’60s, does the Leader of the House agree that it is time that such an inquiry was held, and will he give time for a debate in the House to set the scene for it?

Mr Andrew Lansley (Conservative, Leader of the House of Commons): My hon. Friend has done important work on tackling those issues. He will be aware of the range of inquiries that have taken place, some of which, I hope, are approaching a conclusion. As the Prime Minister has said and recently reiterated to the House, we have not been persuaded of the case for an overarching inquiry; indeed, we feel that there is a significant risk that such an inquiry might impede and delay the resolution of some of the issues in the separate inquiries that are taking place. As the Prime Minister rightly said, however, he will continue actively to keep the question under review.

The following exchange took place at the House of Commons on June 11th, 2014:

Mr Duncan Hames (Liberal Democrat, Chippenham): Mr Speaker, the Prime Minister will have heard calls from Honourable Members on all sides of this House for an independent inquiry on the Hillsborough model into organised child sexual abuse in this country. Can he truly be satisfied that current police investigations are sufficient for the public to have confidence that we are both willing and able to get to the truth?

The Right Hon David Cameron (Prime Minister): I think my Honourable Friend makes a very important point and I have looked at this carefully with Ministerial colleagues, because of course we have a series of inquiries taking place into what happened in various hospitals and care homes and indeed media organisations, and I think it’s very important that Government keeps a clear view about how these are being co-ordinated and how the lessons are being learned. If there is a need for any more over-arching process to be put in place, I’m very happy to look at that, but at the moment, I think led by the Home Secretary and her colleagues, we do have a proper view of what’s happening at all these organisations


A Selection of Important Articles

Eileen Fairweather, ‘WITNESS: Stalinist reluctance to study the facts’, The Independent, May 30th, 1995.
Nick Davies, ‘The sheer scale of child sexual abuse in Britain’, The Guardian, April 1998.
Christian Wolmar, ‘Forgotten Children – the background to the children’s homes scandals’, Independent on Sunday, October 8th, 2000.
Stephen Wright and Richard Pendlebury, ‘Timebomb at Elm Guest House: Pop stars, a bishop and a top politician appear on a list seized by police investigating child abuse at the London hotel in the 1980s’, Daily Mail, February 2nd, 2013.
‘Tory MP warned of powerful paedophile ring 30 years ago. New evidence supports claim former backbencher’s life was threatened’, The Independent, February 22nd, 2013.
‘The Peter Righton Cover-Up’, Spotlight, April 4th, 2013 (includes link to 1994 documentary; for more vital information on Righton, see the collections of articles here, here and here).
Meabh Ritchie, ‘Abuse scandals: Britain’s elite music education in crisis’, Channel 4 News, May 9th, 2013.
‘An open letter to David Cameron’, from Tom Watson’s source, Spotlight, September 16th, 2013.
Mark Conrad, ‘Met’s ‘VIP paedophiles’ probe turns into murder investigation. Police on Operations ‘Fernbridge’ and ‘Fairbank’ examine sadistic killing of young boy’, Exaro News, January 11th, 2014.
Andrew Norfolk, ‘130 private schools in child abuse scandal’, The Times, January 20th, 2014.
Ian Pace, ‘NCCL and PIE – documentary evidence 1′, Desiring Progress, February 25th, 2014.
Keir Mudie and Mark Conrad, ‘Ex-Tory minister ‘pictured in child sex abuse video’ confiscated by customs at Dover in 1982′, Sunday People, March 29th, 2014.
Simon Danczuk, ‘How Cyril Smith evaded the law: Sickening folly of the Left who aided his cause by advocating paedophilia’, Daily Mail, April 12th, 2014.
Tom Pettifor, ‘Tony Blair demands investigation into claims one of his ministers sexually abused children’, Daily Mirror, May 1st, 2014.
Mark Conrad and David Hencke, ”Rapist’ ex-cabinet minister named in Tom Watson’s DPP letter. MP launches blistering attack on Met for failing to interview ex-minister over rape claim’, Exaro News, May 20th, 2014.
Andrew Norfolk, ‘Colet Court and St Paul’s: a culture of child abuse’, The Times, May 20th, 2014.
Tom Pettifor, ‘Was Bulic Forsythe killed to protect paedophile ring ‘linked to future minister in Tony Blair’s government?’, Daily Mirror, May 21st, 2014.


93 Comments on “Please contact your MP to ask for their support for a national inquiry into organised child abuse”

  1. […] Do you want to stop child snatching and paedophile scandals? This is the subject line of an email I sent to all MPs who have not yet expressed their support for the call to a National Enquiry into organised child sexual abuse. […]

  2. […] Please contact your MP to ask for their support for a National Enquiry into organised child sexual a… […]

  3. […] John Hemming and Tessa Munt, Green politician Caroline Lucas, and various others, not least the over 140 MPs who signed the call for a full national inquiry well before the Home Secretary agreed to one) have on the contrary worked relentlessly on bringing […]

  4. […] Please ask your MP to support an Inquiry into organised Child Sexual Abuse […]

  5. […] Friends we are ‘public interest advocates’ and follow white collar crimes associated with organised child sexual abuse and child snatching closely, as we are getting more and more requests for […]

  6. […] Inquiry into Organised Child Sexual Abuse – started by the Magnificent Seven MPs and supported by 142 MPs altogether. I wrote to the 508 others: Do you want to stop child snatching and paedophile scandals? Everybody […]

  7. Armando says:

    Never ever heard of a steam shower enclosure until I came across this website, so pleased I did want to have
    one right now and finances permitting will likely be enjoying one in the near future

  8. […] June, together with a group of others, I was involved in a Twitter campaign to get various MPs to add their names to those calling for a public inquiry into organised child abuse. As I discussed in a post I published on the eve of Simon Danczuk’s appearance before the […]


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 3,443 other followers