Thatcher Cabinet stifled Kincora child sex abuse inquiry 30 years ago

This is once again very important to read in light of developing news.

David Hencke

Lord Prior; pic  courtesy of uk.parliament Lord Prior; pic courtesy of uk.parliament Jim Prior,now Lord Prior. blocked the opportunity for a full-scale public inquiry into the notorious Kincora child abuse scandal, Cabinet minutes released under the 30 year rule revealed today.

The minutes of the Cabinet meeting (seehttp://bit.ly/19zxFqT) reveal on 10 November 1983 Jim Prior, then Northern Ireland Secretary, proposed not to have a full Tribunal of Inquiry – the same mechanism, used to investigate the Bloody Sunday atrocities, the North Wales child abuse scandal and the Dunblane massacre.
The minutes reveal the Cabinet – who included the now all ennobled Leon Brittan, then home secretary, Michael Heseltine,defence secretary and Norman Fowler, social services secretary, bought the Royal Ulster Constabulary line that there was nothing in it. He said he was being “pressed to hold an inquiry under the Tribunals of Inquiry”. But he didn’t believe Parliament would buy it.
But he said two…

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One Comment on “Thatcher Cabinet stifled Kincora child sex abuse inquiry 30 years ago”

  1. Many thanks for this.

    One question that never ceases to arise in my mind when governments and other organisations in positions of power are shown, or suspected, to have covered up or tried to put out to grass conduct of this nature that occurred long before they were themselves in office is “what’s to lose by conducting a full public inquiry?” If such inquiries are handled appropriately and thoroughly, the agreement to hold them when sufficient evidence points to the need to do so could ultimately prove to be a feather in the cap for those governments.

    Of course not all government and other cover-ups are of incidents that occurred, or are alleged to have occured, before its incumbency, but there does nevertheless seem to be a way too prevalent knee-jerk unconsidered response to calls for such inquiries as though those who agree to hold them might somehow end up finding themselves to be at risk or thought to be at risk of something.


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